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Prepare your house for your pet's arrival. A special place should be designated for it to eat, sleep, and eliminate. Obtain any necessary accessories (eg, collar, leash, ID tag, crate, cage, aquarium and dishes) before you bring your pet home. For most pets, you will need to pet-proof your home just as you would child-proof your home to avoid accidents. Harmful cleansers, plants, electrical cords, and breakable objects should be kept out of reach. Open windows should be screened.

Roaming pets are prime candidates for fights with other animals, traffic accidents, and communicable diseases from other animals. Their life span can be expected to be considerably shorter as a result.

Most pets are strictly indoor pets and are perfectly content, as long as they have access to food and fresh water at all times. AVMA strongly recommends that for a healthier, happier pet you consider keeping your pets indoors only. If your pet must go outside, make sure you know where it is at all times, that the pet is old enough to manage on its own, that it is identified in some fashion (microchip ID or breakaway collar and tag), current on vaccinations, and not outdoors in extremely cold, hot, or inclement weather.

If you don't want your pet in certain areas of the house, start training it immediately to avoid those areas. When choosing where your pet will sleep, keep in mind some pets are nocturnal animals and will be active at night. Placing soft bedding materials in secluded corners will help your pet to feel at home.

  • Physical Exam

    Your horse might look as healthy as, well, a horse, making you wonder whether he really needs an annual exam. However, if anything is wrong with your horse’s health, it’s always better to detect a problem earlier rather than later. Your equine veterinarian can also advise on preventive measures to

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  • Thyroid Problems

    The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system and consists of two lobes located on the front of a horse’s neck. This gland produces hormones that regulate the body’s metabolism and affect most of the body’s tissues. When functioning normally, the thyroid is not visible, but certain diseases

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  • Seizures

    A seizure is caused by a period of abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Seizures tend to come on suddenly and end by themselves. They also sometimes occur again. There are three main types of seizures: Partial (or focused) seizures affect one part of the brain, which, in turn, leads to symptoms

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  • Venereal Disease

    Venereal diseases, also known as sexually-transmitted infections or diseases, are infections that can be passed during sexual contact. In horses, the two most common ones include: Equine viral arteritis Contagious equine metritis Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) Equine viral arteritis is a contagious

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  • Viral Infectious Diseases

    Infectious diseases are those that one horse passes to another, or that mosquitoes or other vectors transmit. Some are more common than others. Treatments and prognoses vary, but your veterinarian can help by recommending appropriate vaccinations. Here are some of the more common viral diseases. Equine

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  • Arthritis in Horses

    Arthritis is one of the most common conditions causing lameness in older horses; in fact, arthritis is responsible for up to 60 percent of all lameness. Arthritis can affect the knee, joint, fetlock, coffin and hock. Arthritis that affects the pastern is also known as “ringbone.” Arthritis is the

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  • Barns to Pastureland

    If you are to get the best from your horse, it is vital that you provide him with a happy, comfortable and safe home environment. This applies whether he is kept in a horse barn or in a field. As a general rule, a particularly fine-coated horse, or one that is in hard work, needs to be stabled during

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  • Examining Your Horse

    Even if you fall in love with the horse, do not buy it before the animal has been thoroughly examined by a veterinarian with experience in performing purchase examinations. Long-time horse owners almost always have a veterinarian examine any animal before purchase and first-time owners should certainly

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  • Food and Nutrition

    From your point of view, as the caregiver, it is important to familiarize your horse with being handled-and of course, it is always gratifying to have a horse with a clean and smart appearance. Feeding your horse correctly is a vital element of effective horse care. A horse's natural grazing pattern

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  • Horse Health

    Looking after a horse is a complicated and, at times, trying experience. Part of a well horse health program includes routine vaccination and deworming. In addition to caring for the inside, however, two simple ways to maintain horse health are regular grooming and equine massage. Vaccinations Vaccinations

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  • Where Do You Look For a Horse?

    A good place to buy a horse is the stable where you ride or plan to keep the horse. The stable owner has an interest in keeping you satisfied, and knowing your abilities and temperament he or she can suggest a suitable animal. Riding instructors are also good agents for locating a suitable horse since

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  • Understanding EHV Equine Herpesvirus

    Equine Herpesvirus (EHV-1) is an infection in horses that can cause respiratory disease, abortion in mares, neonatal foal death, and/or neurologic disease. When this infection spreads neurologically, it is referred to as Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). This virus is spread through the air,

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  • Preventing Snakebites

    Snakebites are not limited to humans, nor is it limited to any specific region of the world. Taking precautions to minimize the occurrence is first and foremost, but knowing what signs to recognize can keep your horse from developing serious or fatal health concerns from snakebite. Possible Signs of

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  • No Sweat: It's a Problem

    Horses, like humans, sweat to cool themselves in warm weather and during periods of exertion. In hot climates, especially humid ones, failure to sweat often means that they are prone to over-heating and cannot be worked. This condition is called anhidrosis. It is unknown what causes anhidrosis and treatment

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